PUBLISHED: by JOY DEPOY

Learning to Self-Regulate

2018

Carla B. Goble

Social-Emotional

Infant-Toddler Social Studies

Cross-lateral

Infant/Toddler

Birth-4 Months

Learning to Self-Regulate

Ask the infant’s primary caregiver what comfort items are used at home. Ask families to provide a duplicate of the comfort item for use while the infant is in care.

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Help the infant develop a way to self-regulate by consistently using the same item to help the child calm himself.

Note that some comfort items are more useful and appropriate for infants than others. Infants will begin to hold on to a caregiver’s hair, finger, or hand or hold the collar or sleeve of a caregiver’s shirt. Be aware of what an infant is beginning to use as a way of comforting himself and then either support this or help him move toward a more suitable item. Holding the caregiver’s hair while falling asleep may become problematic over time.

The abilities to self-regulate and calm self The use of a comfort item

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Sharing a Smile

2016

Cathy Waggoner

Social-Emotional

Starting with Character

Cross-lateral

Infant/Toddler

Birth-3 Months

Sharing a Smile

None needed

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Help infants learn to smile by smiling at them. Hold your face about ten inches from baby’s face (about the distance on which her eyes can focus in the first three months) and share your happy, loving expressions. The baby will enjoy watching your expressions and will begin responding to them. When you smile, you will eventually be rewarded with a smile in return.

Smiling transcends languages and cultures. It translates as an expression of enjoyment and a demonstration of caring feelings for others. Sharing a smile while making eye contact with a baby is a powerful way to demonstrate caring. Babies begin to watch and mimic facial expressions immediately after birth (Meltzoff and Moore 1983). They are drawn to smiling faces and will try to imitate a smile (Witherington et al. 2010). Your loving attention to infants helps to build their foundation of self- confidence and positive self- worth.

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Playtime

2018

Carla B. Goble

Social-Emotional

Infant-Toddler Social Studies

Cross-lateral

Infant/Toddler

Birth-4 Months

Playtime

Toy

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During tummy floor time, place two infants a few feet apart and facing each other. Put a toy on the floor between them. Lie down with them or sit close. Encourage each child to lift her head up to see the toy. Talk about the toy and what each infant is seeing, including the other baby. Call each child by name and give each verbal encouragement as both develop the ability to raise their heads and look at toys and each other.

Each day, change the pairings so that each child has this experience with every other child in the room.

To learn to play near another infant. To promote social skills and social development

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