DOUBLE TAP TO ZOOM ON PHONE OR TABLET
ASSESSMENT WHAT TO LOOK FOR
RELATED COMMENTS/QUESTIONS
Children may use all of the materials as brushes
and smear the paint. This is fine, but teachers
can also show them the technique used for cre-
ating imprints.

The fur made a wide line on your paper. Here’s
another idea. You can place it flat on your
paper and then pick it up. Now I see little lines
from the fur.

Some children will notice the geometric shapes
created by the scales.

Wow, you made some interesting shapes. Let’s
count the sides to see what shapes you made.

Children may not notice whether or not the
material absorbs the paint unless the teacher
points it out.

Can the paint get through to the other side of
the scales? I guess if a snake rolls in the mud,
the mud stays on the outside of the snake.

If asked, some children may notice that the
scales interlock to cover the whole surface.

There is a really cool word for shapes that
interlock like that—tessellation. The tiles on
the floor and the outside of a soccer ball are
tessellations. ELEMENTS OF SCIENTIFIC INQUIRY
Observe: Children will observe the marks cre-
ated on the paper by the various materials.

Compare/contrast: Children will compare the
paint marks to the material that created them.

Experiment: Children will experiment with
using the materials in different ways, such as
creating brushstrokes, imprints, smears, or
patterns. Communicate: Children will discuss the lines
and imprints they are making.

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LIFE SCIENCE—ANIMALS
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DOUBLE TAP TO ZOOM ON PHONE OR TABLET
ACTIVITY 2.6
Types of Feet:
Animal Footprints
DESCRIPTION One of the ways in which animals differ is by the
type of feet they have. Different types of feet are
adapted for different purposes. In this activity,
children not only create animal footprints but
also compare the size and shape of their feet to
the feet of various animals. In addition, they sort
animals into groups based on their feet.

STANDARDS Next Generation Science Standards,
Kindergarten – K-LS1-1 From Molecules to
Organisms: Structures and Processes (Life
Sciences) Head Start Early Learning Outcomes
Framework – Scientific Reasoning (Scien-
tific Inquiry)
Goal P-SCI 1. Child observes and describes observ-
able phenomena (objects, materials, organisms,
and events).

Iowa Early Learning Standards –
Mathematics and Science
12.4.5. Uses data from observations to describe the
world, including patterns, cause-and-effect rela-
tionships, and predictions.

Use observations to describe patterns in the natural
world in order to answer scientific questions.

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CHAPTER 2
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