DOUBLE TAP TO ZOOM ON PHONE OR TABLET
Retelling Stories
with Language and
Understanding 2
T eachers who work with young children plan experiences designed to de-
velop language and understanding. As in the example below, children are
encouraged when teachers, parents, and caregivers repeat their words and of-
fer new concepts and words with encouragement or joyful voices. Integral to
the work of early childhood educators is the development of language, which
teachers use many differentiation strategies to achieve. Children between the
ages of three and five represent a wide developmental span. In addition to the
span in ages and developmental levels, preschool children represent varied
cultures, socioeconomic statuses, and experiences. Teachers must plan learn-
ing experiences that provide growth for all children. The need for continuous
The teacher stops reading and says with surprise, “The pan does look like a ball!” The
toddler repeats, “Ball!” and pats the page again. His teacher says, “Yes, ball!” They make
eye contact and smile as though sharing an inside joke. The child says, “Ball,” followed
by, “no, no, no.” The teacher repeats, “Ball, no, no, no, David!” Later, the teacher shares
her joy over the incident, the first time the child labeled a picture in a book with her.

(McWilliams, June 2015 research notes)
COPYRIGHTED MATERIAL
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