DOUBLE TAP TO ZOOM WITH PHONE OR TABLET COPYRIGHTED MATERIAL DOUBLE TAP TO ZOOM WITH PHONE OR TABLET COPYRIGHTED MATERIAL DOUBLE TAP TO ZOOM WITH PHONE OR TABLET Published by Redleaf Press 10 Yorkton Court St. Paul, MN 55117 www.redleafpress.org © 2016 by Lisa Murphy All rights reserved. Unless otherwise noted on a specific page, no portion of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or cap- turing on any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher, except by a reviewer, who may quote brief passages in a critical article or review to be printed in a magazine or news- paper, or electronically transmitted on radio, television, or the Internet. First edition published 2009. Second edition 2016 Cover design by Amy Fastenau Cover photographs/illustrations by Yarruta Interior design by Amy Fastenau Typeset in PMN Caecilia and Lemon Sans Printed in the United States of America Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data Names: Murphy, Lisa, 1969- author. Title: Lisa Murphy on play : the foundation of children’s learning / Lisa    Murphy. Other titles: Play-- the foundation that supports the house of higher    learning | Play Description: Second edition. | St. Paul, MN : Redleaf Press, [2016] | Earlier    edition published as: Play-- the foundation that supports the house of    higher learning. | Includes bibliographical references. Identifiers: LCCN 2015040240| ISBN 9781605544410 (pbk.) | ISBN 9781605544427    (ebook) Subjects: LCSH: Play. | Early childhood education. | Child development. Classification: LCC HQ782 .M866 2016 | DDC 155.4/18--dc23 LC record available at http://lccn.loc.gov/2015040240 COPYRIGHTED MATERIAL DOUBLE TAP TO ZOOM WITH PHONE OR TABLET For my brother Tom. I had something to say—you helped me say it. COPYRIGHTED MATERIAL DOUBLE TAP TO ZOOM WITH PHONE OR TABLET Necessity may be the mother of invention, but play is most certainly the father. Roger von Oech, A Whack on the Side of the Head COPYRIGHTED MATERIAL DOUBLE TAP TO ZOOM WITH PHONE OR TABLET Contents Introduction to the Second Edition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 The Binder Challenge. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Part 1 How I Got Here. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 1 Mornings with Mary. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 A Crystallizing Moment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 2 At Any Given Moment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 3 Getting with the Program. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 4 Starting the Journey . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 5 A New Beginning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 The Seven Things . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 6 Teach Us to Read!. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 7 Strengthening the Foundation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 8 When Does the Playing Stop?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 9 Meaningful Experiences. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 Part 2 The Seven Things . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 10 Make Time Each Day to . . . CREATE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Creative Tips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 Creativity Killers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 Twenty Basic Scribbles. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 The Importance of Creating: A Review . . . . . . . . . 83 Some Things to Think About . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 Notable and Quotable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85 COPYRIGHTED MATERIAL DOUBLE TAP TO ZOOM WITH PHONE OR TABLET 11 Make Time Each Day to . . . MOVE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 Today’s Specials: Labels du Jour and Acronyms à la Mode . . . . . . . . . 88 How About Those Learning Styles? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 The Importance of Risk Taking. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95 The Importance of Moving: A Review . . . . . . . . . . . . 98 Some Things to Think About . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98 Making It Meaningful. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106 Some Songs to Get You Started. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110 Favorite Children’s Musicians. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111 The Importance of Singing: A Review . . . . . . . . . 112 Notable and Quotable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99 12 Make Time Each Day to . . . SING. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101 Some Things to Think About . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112 Discussion Destroyers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116 Discussing Leads to Problem Solving. . . . . . . . . . . 120 But What Are They Learning?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124 Just Because They Can Doesn’t Mean They Should . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128 Much More than a Catchy Phrase! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129 The Importance of Discussing: A Review . . . . . . 131 Notable and Quotable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113 13 Make Time Each Day to . . . DISCUSS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114 Some Things to Think About . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131 Notable and Quotable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132 14 Make Time Each Day to . . . OBSERVE. . . . . . . . . . . . . 134 The Sense of Touch. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136 The Sense of Smell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139 The Sense of Taste . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141 The Sense of Hearing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142 The Sense of Sight. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145 The Importance of Observing: A Review. . . . . . . 147 Some Things to Think About . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148 Notable and Quotable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149 COPYRIGHTED MATERIAL DOUBLE TAP TO ZOOM WITH PHONE OR TABLET 15 Make Time Each Day to . . . READ. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150 A Very Short List of My Favorite Children’s Picture Books. . . . . . . . . . . . 159 A Very Small List of My Favorite Classic Chapter Books. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 162 The Importance of Reading: A Review. . . . . . . . . 163 Some Things to Think About . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163 Notable and Quotable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 164 16 Make Time Each Day to . . . PLAY. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 165 If We Link It to a Standard, Then Can We Let Them Play? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171 A Dream? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 174 What Is a “Good” Program?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 175 The Importance of Playing: A Review . . . . . . . . . 177 Some Things to Think About . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 178 Notable and Quotable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179 Part 3 Challenges We Face . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 181 17 Challenges We Face. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183 Challenges to Creating. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 184 Challenges to Moving. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 185 Challenges to Singing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 185 Challenges to Discussing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 185 Challenges to Observing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 186 Challenges to Reading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 186 Challenges to Playing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 187 18 Final Thoughts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 188 BIBLIOGRAPHY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 193 SUGGESTED READINGS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 195 COPYRIGHTED MATERIAL DOUBLE TAP TO ZOOM WITH PHONE OR TABLET COPYRIGHTED MATERIAL DOUBLE TAP TO ZOOM WITH PHONE OR TABLET Introduction to the Second Edition WHEN I WROTE the first edition of Play, I wanted to capture the es- sence of where I was in my career. David Heath at Redleaf Press said it read as though I had a point to make, something to prove. And he was right. I joked that I wanted every line to have a reference or footnote in an effort to show readers that play-based early child- hood programming wasn’t Lisa Murphy’s personal preference, but is actually what is supported in the research. Since Play was initially published, my theories and patience have been challenged and tested. This led to both a broadening and deepening of my understanding of early childhood education. In addition, my desire to prove has evolved more into a commit- ment to connecting. What does that mean? To put it plainly, I have ceased defending that which has already been proven. Instead of spending energy on feeble efforts to prove (which often fall on deaf, stubborn ears), I put this same energy into connecting people with the evidence. How do I do this? I put the burden of proof on the naysayer. What does that mean? It means if you tell me I need to eliminate recess, do flash cards with preschoolers, or do the calen- dar with toddlers, I am going to professionally respond, “What page is that on?” or “Where is that supported in the research?” or “Why?” or “Prove it.” COPYRIGHTED MATERIAL 1 DOUBLE TAP TO ZOOM WITH PHONE OR TABLET The Binder Challenge The reason I can push back with confidence is because I hold myself accountable to the same challenge I currently propose to my work- shop audience members, social media followers, and readers. What is that challenge, you ask? It is the Binder Challenge. I have outlined it in detail in other places, but in a nutshell, and for the sake of page counts and time, this is what you do: 1. Get a binder. 2. On the front write PLAYFUL LEARNING = SCHOOL READINESS with subtitle PRESENTING THE EVIDENCE. 3. Then, from this point forward every time you find something that supports a hands-on, play-based, relationship-based, child-centered, developmentally appropriate, early childhood environment, you copy it and put it in your binder. It might be any of the following: ƒƒ an article ƒƒ a letter to an editor ƒƒ a photograph you took of a playful sign at a playground ƒƒ a book (But don’t copy the book! That’s ILLEGAL! Copy the cover and the copyright page.) ƒƒ workshop notes ƒƒ workshop handouts ƒƒ playful activity ideas/recipes ƒƒ blog posts ƒƒ links to various playful websites ƒƒ research studies ƒƒ scholarly papers that you or someone else wrote Anything that reinforces and supports the fact that this mind-set and approach is not new goes in your binder. Anything that reminds naysayers that this is not simply our personal preference now goes in your binder. Anything that supports the fact that this is not just what we “like” or what we “want” but is in actuality supported by 2 introduction COPYRIGHTED MATERIAL DOUBLE TAP TO ZOOM WITH PHONE OR TABLET the literature, data, science, and experience now gets read, copied, and put it in your binder. 4. When someone comes to the school, your room, the office, your family child care, the playroom, wherever and is like, “PPPLLLLLLLLAAAAYYYY? YOU STILL PLAY? OMG! THEY ARE GOING TO KINDERGARTEN IN THREE YEARS! HOW CAN YOU DO THIS?” You take a big, deep, loving breath [this part—the love part—is way more important than you might realize!] and say, “Yes. Playful learning [this is important, say it all together, ‘playful learning’] leads to, supports, increases [pick something that works for your mouth] school readiness. And this [point to kids engaged] is what it looks like! And this [point to the binders] is what supports it. [pause] “May I make you a cup of coffee?” On a more personal note, quite a bit has happened since I originally published Play. I earned my M.Ed. in early childhood education, began some fruitful collaborative projects with many other passionate play-based educators, and watched this book evolve from an idea to being printed to being a popular book club suggestion to being a college textbook to being an e-book! I have had the fortunate opportunity to present workshops in almost every U.S. state, Jamaica, and most of Canada (including the Arctic Circle!), and signed on with Redleaf Press as one of their authors. I am proud to be working with them on this updated edition and am grateful for their input on the process. I had been toying around with whether Play needed a revision, and every time I reread it, I’ll be honest with you, I said to myself, “No, leave it alone.” Why? Because while, in formal academic-speak, in research years it is approaching being “dated,” the core message is the same, still accurate and on point. So I left it alone. Then it came to my attention that the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) was going to be published in 2013. The DSM lists the diagnostic criteria for psychological disorders. COPYRIGHTED MATERIAL introduction 3 DOUBLE TAP TO ZOOM WITH PHONE OR TABLET The fifth edition was to contain many changes, including modifica- tions to how attention deficit disorder (ADD) and attention deficit/ hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) were categorized. (For the curious, they are no longer two separate diagnoses; the term used now is ADHD.) The proposed changes to the language used in the DSM-5 are what really pushed me to consider an update to Play, as I didn’t want new readers referencing outdated information from chapter 2 (MOVE) of the book. Initially I planned on only revising this one chapter. But a handful of colleagues who remain infinitely more insightful than myself persuaded me to reconsider by telling me that there was a good chance that my writing voice and my knowledge base had changed since the original publication. “Why infuse only one part of the book with this?” they asked. “It might sound choppy and inconsistent,” they said. True words, honest words, complimentary words, yet all my brain heard was THAT WILL TAKE MORE TIME! ALERT! ALERT! THAT WILL MAKE MORE WORK! RESIST! RESIST! But in the end I knew they were right. So we changed the title, made a plan for revising the guts, slapped a new picture on the cover, and gave the whole book a trip to the editorial day spa. Why put in the effort? Because a child’s right to play continues to come under attack, and this is no longer acceptable. Our culture continues to reinforce the false dichotomy of playing versus learning, incor- rectly believing that when children play they are being deprived of something more important. I am not, am NOT, going to stop being developmentally appro- priate, nor will I second-guess best practice because the person in front of me has never seen it! And I will NOT compromise the child- hood experience just because the school down the street, which might charge $20 less a week, does! Nor will I cease doing what is right and best for the kids just because the teacher down the hall is inconvenienced by it! Now, don’t get fired because you are reading this book! But it is important to realize that there is no need to reinvent the wheel. The framework of what constitutes “developmentally appropri- ate” exists. The research that supports playful learning exists. The 4 introduction COPYRIGHTED MATERIAL DOUBLE TAP TO ZOOM WITH PHONE OR TABLET anecdotes exist. The success stories exist. Why some early child- hood people continue to resist embracing play, even in the face of decades of research that supports it, boggles the mind. We know better yet continue to be faced with this huge disconnect between theory and practice. Which is a fancy way of saying that we know better yet for some reason aren’t willing to act on it. I selfishly hope that something in this book might assist you in taking a baby step toward reinfusing play in the lives of young children; perhaps a particular story or data point might increase your confidence as you speak out with me as an advocate of playful learning. I do not claim to have all the answers, and what I offer here represents only the tip of the iceberg of available evidence that supports the cause of play. That being said, it is with unbri- dled passion, outspoken advocacy, and a spirit of sharing that I offer the contents contained herein as resources, stories, evidence, and information that might assist us in our combined efforts to show that play is the foundation of children’s learning. COPYRIGHTED MATERIAL introduction 5 DOUBLE TAP TO ZOOM WITH PHONE OR TABLET COPYRIGHTED MATERIAL DOUBLE TAP TO ZOOM WITH PHONE OR TABLET Part 1 How I Got Here COPYRIGHTED MATERIAL DOUBLE TAP TO ZOOM WITH PHONE OR TABLET COPYRIGHTED MATERIAL DOUBLE TAP TO ZOOM WITH PHONE OR TABLET 1 Mornings with Mary SHE OPENED THE door and stepped out onto the porch. She was Miss Mary. My new teacher, my first teacher. She smiled as I scam- pered up the walkway and up the steps to the front door. She bent down, looked me right in the eye, took my hand, and said, “Come on in, let me show you what we do here.” I was three years old, and this was my first day of school. Mary proceeded to take me on a tour of the little house that was Mary’s Nursery School. This is what I remember: The first room was filled with wooden unit blocks, Legos, cars, carpet squares, dollhouses, and huge hollow blocks. Over the years, hundreds of children spent hours in this room designing, balancing, measuring, and engineer- ing the architectural feats of childhood. You could stay in this room until you were done. Absent were adults flicking lights, singing cute songs, and making us clean up before we were finished. Mary and I walked into the second room. If we viewed that room today, through a Reggio lens, it would now be referred to as the atelier. It was a workshop of sorts where creativity was encour- aged and flourished via ample offerings of easels, palettes, brushes, paints, watercolors, crayons, paste, playdough, and clay. Next door, the tiny bathroom was outfitted with child-sized toi- lets, shelves of books to help pass the time, a small step to reach the sink, and children’s artwork gracing the walls! COPYRIGHTED MATERIAL 9 DOUBLE TAP TO ZOOM WITH PHONE OR TABLET The entrance to the kitchen was a restaurant-style swinging door with a round window that allowed adults to see the comings and goings of the kitchen. Toward the bottom of the door was a smaller hole so children could see too. What was probably the former family room now served as a gath- ering area where we were offered couches, pillows, and beanbags. There was a flannel board, a piano, and rows and rows of books! So many books! Mike Mulligan and His Steam Shovel, Where the Wild Things Are, The Little House, Caps for Sale, The Very Hungry Caterpillar, The Story of Babar: The Little Elephant . . . books as far as I could see! Many years later, as an adult, I recalled a book from my time at Mary’s Nursery School. All I could remember was that it was about a young boy who was eating a lot of pancakes and that it had many black-and-white  photographs. With a nod to a gentleman who ran a bookstore in San Diego, I am pleased to report that he located the book, Do You Know What I Am Going to Do Next Saturday? by H ele n Palm e r. I re read it recently and am not sure if any- one would be willing to publish it nowadays, but let me tell you it’s awesome! Across from this gathering area were the tables we used for activ- ities and snack. Each was draped w it h   a   r e d-a nd-wh it e   c he c k e d tablecloth and surrounded by low benches. Mar y used communal benches in lieu of individual chairs, a small, subtle way she encouraged language and social development. Behind the tables was the door that led to the covered back porch, and there was more out there! The porch was a world all in itself. On one side there were boxes of dress-up clothes: capes, high-heeled shoes, feather boas, raincoats, a bunch of different kinds of shirts, fireman boots, construction hats, and party dresses. In the middle there were more art easels. A cotton string, the full length of the porch, was suspended above me. “The drying line,” Mary said, “for your pictures.” Long wooden brushes peeked out from orange juice cans serving as paint cups. More paint and extra brushes rested on the wooden cable spool that doubled as a table. At the other end of the porch was a waist-high wooden 10 chapter 1 COPYRIGHTED MATERIAL DOUBLE TAP TO ZOOM WITH PHONE OR TABLET sandbox filled with a kind of soft white sand that I can still smell if I close my eyes. Scoops, funnels, eggbeaters, flour sifters, wooden spoons, measuring cups, and muffin tins lay an arm’s length away, waiting to be employed by a child’s imagination. Miss Mary opened the screen door that led from the porch to the backyard. Ahhh, the yard! Without any exaggeration I can say that, as a three-year-old, it was unlike any other I had ever seen! Here were swings, ladders, structures to climb, bikes to ride, ham- mers for pounding, ducks and chickens to chase, bunnies to hold, and water to splash. There were cable spools to roll and jump from, capes to wear, nails and wood for building things, baby dolls for washing, and a boat! A real boat for painting on and pretending in. There was a sandpit for digging with real shovels, bubbles for blow- ing, and right in the middle of the yard a tall metal slide that was hotter than Hades and as high as the sun. We stood there together in the yard. I didn’t move. I was taking it all in. Then she gently let go of my hand, bent down, and, in a voice I can still hear, once again looking me square in the eye, said, “Go play.” I burst onto the yard and spent the morning running around, climbing trees, playing tag, jumping through mud puddles, climb- ing a rope ladder, reading books, singing songs, splashing water, painting pictures . . . playing. I would spend the next two years with my Miss Mary, Miss Nancy, and Miss Gerry. I would play hard, sing loud, and make mud pies. I would climb trees, run with friends, jump rope, and build blocks. I would listen to songs, make puppets, and draw pictures. Sometimes I would get mad and hit other kids, only to cry big tears when the same was done to me. I would make friends, push them away, and attempt to get my way by withholding invitations to a nonexistent party. I would be very loud and incredibly quiet. But today, this first day, while my shoes were still new and my lunch box still shiny, I would have snack. No one could have possibly foreseen the impact this snack would have on my adult life. What do I mean? OK, so I was a pretty average COPYRIGHTED MATERIAL mornings with mary 11 DOUBLE TAP TO ZOOM WITH PHONE OR TABLET kid, perhaps occasionally a little more talkative, sometimes more active, but overall a typical, playful little kid who enjoyed most of the traditional activities children enjoy. But I had an unusual favor- ite snack. Not grahams, not PB&Js, not applesauce or pretzels with oranges, but cheese. And not just regular cheese, but hot, spicy jalapeño pepper jack cheese. I could eat it on crackers, by itself, on bread, but my favorite way to enjoy it was with a slice of a crunchy red apple. So here’s what happened on my first day of school: At some point in the morning our play came to a halt with an invitation to come and have snack. I say invitation because no one was required to come in for snack, no threats were given if toys were not promptly put away, no general mandates to join the group at the table. Miss Mary sent an invitation through that dusty screen on the porch: “Come on in if you’re hungry!” I was hungry! Her invitation prompted the hasty dropping of shovels and buck- ets back into the sandbox, the jumping of children off the tops of climbing equipment, hoses being shut off, easel brushes tossed back into paint cups, and bunnies returned to cages. It was time to eat. We had been playing all morning, and we were starving. We came inside, washed our hands, and sat down at the benches around the tables. We poured water or milk (our choice!) from small pitchers into small cups and passed around the napkins. As I took my nap- kin, the kitchen door swung open. Miss Mary came out from the kitchen holding the big snack tray, and on it were piles of crunchy red apples and slices of hot pepper jack cheese. I just about fell out of my chair! Could this cheese be just for me? It was like being invited to a dinner party where the hostess made all your favorite foods because she wanted you to know how excited she was to have you there! I looked up at Miss Mary as she put the snack tray down in front of me. She leaned in toward me and whispered in my ear, “We are so glad you are here.” In that moment I had a very brief yet very powerful experience. I had a crystallizing moment: I knew then and there that I would become a teacher. 12 chapter 1 COPYRIGHTED MATERIAL DOUBLE TAP TO ZOOM WITH PHONE OR TABLET A Crystallizing Moment Howard Gardner tells us that at any given moment of any given day we could be facilitating an experience that makes a lifelong impact. He calls this a “crystallizing moment.” And as teachers, we never know when one might occur. Could be Monday, Friday, the rainy day, the day we are in a good mood, the day we are in a bad mood. We cannot plan, schedule, buy, or coordinate a crys- tallizing moment. There isn’t a signal, a bell, or a loud trumpet indicating one has happened: “Crystallizing Moment! Room 5! GO! Go! Go!” Ideally, crystallizing moments occur when we are at our best. Unfortunately, for some, it’s when an adult was at their worst. Crystallizing moments can be happy memories or sad ones. This is only one of the many reasons why we MUST be fully present when we are with children and must never never, ever ever underesti- mate the impact of what we do. I highly doubt Miss Mary thought, “Boy, I bet this cheese is going to be a big hit with the new kid!” She was simply doing what she did best. She was aware of the children, our needs, our simple wishes, and our comfort. I’m sure the casual (probably routine) call she placed to my mom sounded something like this: “Hi Laura! We are getting ready for Lisa’s arrival! Since Monday is her first day at school and her first day ever away from you, we want her to have a smooth transition, maybe provide something that she really likes for snack. What’s her favorite?” A two-minute phone call that made a lifelong impact. The why behind my work, the fire in my belly, and the passion in my heart can all be traced back to when Miss Mary came through that swing- ing kitchen door carrying the snack tray. It all started with the cheese. COPYRIGHTED MATERIAL mornings with mary 13 PLAY  / CURRICULUM / STRATEGIES /  EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION DOUBLE TAP TO ZOOM WITH PHONE OR TABLET Children’s play Is school readiness In this inspirational narrative, early childhood expert Lisa Murphy shows how play builds the foundation for later learning and academic success. v v Explore “The Seven Things” we should do with young children every day: create, move, sing, discuss, observe, read, and play v v Discover easy and fun ways to integrate “The Seven Things” into each day v v Learn how to link concepts to experiences young children understand v v Examine professional challenges you might face and how to work through them This entertaining book will inspire and challenge you to bring play and joy back into the early childhood education experience. ¯ ¯ ° ° ° ¯ ¯ “Lisa Murphy says it exactly as it needs to be said. Play is the foundation. She says it with humor even as she backs it up with eons of research. But most importantly she shares the fire in her belly with us, infusing us with her enormous passion and dedication to doing what’s best for children.” —Tamar Jacobson, PhD, author of Don’t Get So Upset! Help Young Children Manage Their Feelings by Understanding Your Own “Make time on your schedule. Lisa Murphy on Play is not only a book you need to buy, it’s a book you need to read.” —Jeff Johnson, early learning advocate, speaker, and author LISA MURPHY, MEd, has been involved in early childhood education for over 20 years, teaching and working with young children. She is the founder and CEO of Ooey Gooey, Inc., has produced dozens of training DVDs, and is a nationally recognized presenter and keynote speaker. Murphy is the author of the activity books The Ooey Gooey Handbook, Ooey Gooey Tooey, and Even More Fizzle, Bubble, Pop & Wow: Simple Science Experiments for Young Children. All her books and DVDs are available from Redleaf Press. ISBN 978-1-60554-441-0 COPYRIGHTED MATERIAL $24.95