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Index A
academic learning, 184, 185–86,
191–96 academic readiness emphasis, 14–15
academic skills vs. intellectual engage-
ment, 4
academic teaching, 214–15
accessibility project, 158–64
achievement gaps, 3
activism, through accessibility project,
161 activities, engaging, 231–34
adventure, children’s need for, 52–53
aesthetic processes, 307–8
Aubel, Christina, 90–94
authors’ website, 8
B babies, making friends with, 223
babies’ brains, 3–4
beauty, children’s concepts about,
169–70 beginning reflections
behavior management, 73–74
caring for infants and toddlers,
217–18 child-centered curriculum, 245
child-centered learning environ-
ments, 33
curriculum planning, 12
curriculum themes, 125
developmentally appropriate
practice (DAP), 99
on learning, 179
making changes in your life, 289–90
behavior management, 73–74, 82–86
behaviors, guiding, 91–94, 95–97
Bennett, Candy, 56–57
biased stereotypes, countering, 52
bilingual language learning, 196–97
birthdays in pretend play, 135
body themes, 144–46
books, homemade, 190
brains, babies’, 3–4
Brown, Margaret Wise, 222
bucket dilemma, 304–5
C cardboard box curriculum, 46
caregiving routines, analyzing, 227–28
caring for infants and toddlers, 242–43
castles curriculum, 116–20
challenging and nourishing yourself,
320–22 challenging behaviors, 82–83
change and challenge, continuous, 302
checklists desired outcomes for a child-
centered curriculum, 274–75
“on-your-knees,” 34–35
“Chelsea’s Teacher” (Aubel), 91–94
Chicago Commons, 117–20, 312
327 COPYRIGHTED MATERIAL
child-centered curriculum, desired
outcomes for, 274–275
child-centered curriculum approach
children’s interests in, 116
documentation in, 311–12 (See also
documentation) elements of, 41
focus of, 17
learning to use, 248–49
skills required for, 103–7
theme planning in, 126–27
uncertainty in, 282
See also curriculum and curricula
child-centered schedules, 77–78
childhood, ensuring time for, 75–76
children future requirements of, 3
learning about others, 50–52
learning context for, 4, 14–15, 301
learning from, 305–6
needs of, in early education, 291–92
negative vs. competent view of,
84–85 point of view, 34–35, 85–86
and relationships, 95–97
children’s books, as curriculum
resource, 221–23
children’s cues, principles for reading
and responding to, 226
children’s fears, in pretend play,
136–37