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DOUBLE TAB TO ZOOM ON PHONE OR TABLET 328 Index children’s interactions, 87–88, 142, 225 children’s lives, representations of, 49–50 children’s play complex, 113–14, 275 construction in, 132–33 enriching, 258–59 games with rules, 138–39 pretending, 133–37 stages of, 130–32 sustaining, 258 themes, 129–39 valuing, 301–2 web of stages, 271 children’s theories about emotions, 169 Chocolate, Deborah, 221 Clark College Early Childhood Education, 56 classification and comparison oppor- tunities, 50–51 Classroom and Community News Center, 50 classroom maintenance, 142 classroom routines assessment of, 65–71 in child-centered emergent approach, 253–54 flexibility in, 40 for meaningful writing, 189–90 as a source of curriculum, 226–28 cleanup kits, 141 coaching in behalf of children’s power, 80 in child-centered curriculum, 41 direct, 184 to extend engaged activity, 16 opportunities for, 43 reflections on, 94 with safety guidelines, 45 to share ideas and competencies, 88 collaboration, 54, 167–69, 282, 303–4 collections for engaging activities, 232–33 color-coded web, 270 commercialism, reflections on, 13 comparison and classification opportunities, 50–51 complex play, 113–14, 275 construction play, 132–33 context for children’s learning, 4, 14–15, 301 Cornelius, Laurie S., 55–65 creative expression, providing for, 150 cultivating aesthetics, 306–8 curriculum and curricula articulating your approach, 285–86 child-centered, 116–20, 166–71, 245, 247 cocreating, 248–49 documenting the unfolding of, 261–67 evaluating, 274–75 for infants and toddlers, 45–47, 218–19 representing your approach, 267–73 traditional, 20–23 curriculum planning beginning reflections, 12 decision framework, 254 listening to children in, 158–64 notes on your approach to, 31 traditional vs. child-centered approaches to, 18–20, 100–103 curriculum plans, analyzing, 20–27 Curriculum Plans form, 269 Curriculum Theme forms, 236–37 curriculum themes, 125 See also themes curriculum webs, 159, 270 Curtis, Deb, 238–41 D developmentally appropriate practices (DAP), 99, 100 developmental themes, 250–51 development cycles, recursive, 89 direct instruction, 121, 155, 191 dispositions, 299–305 Dispositions for Child-Centered Teachers form, 300 documentation of curriculum development, 261–67, 311–12 Felstiner on, 276–83 as guideline for teaching, 281–82 guidelines for, 107–8 the power of, 162 as process and product, 261–65 domain content, children’s appetite for, 4–5 dreams, cultivating, 36 Drummond, Tom, 311 E earthquakes, in pretend play, 137 emergent approach. See child-centered curriculum approach Englebright Fox, Jill, 307 COPYRIGHTED MATERIAL environmental themes, 250 exploration by children, 130–32, 148, 234–35 F fabric curriculum, 46 family child care providers, 28–30 farm curriculum, 46 Felstiner, Sarah A., 276–84 flexibility, in space and classroom routines, 40 floods, in pretend play, 136–37 food experiences, 49 food packaging and odd items cur- riculum, 47 “From Scribbles to Name Writing” (Lieberman), 208–13 G games with rules, 138–39 Goodnight Moon (Brown), 222 grant writing, 56–57 guidance goals, 75 guidelines for observation, 107–8 guidelines for teaching, 280–82 guidelines vs. rules, 59–60 guiding behavior and supporting relationships, 95–97 H habitat planning, 64 helping classmates, 142 Highline Head Start, 312–15 honesty, as guideline for teaching, 280 hot buttons and self-awareness, 83–84 Hunter, Tom, 3, 182, 322, 324 I “Igniting a Passion for Learning through Uncovering Children’s Interest” (Norwood), 116–20 imagination, cultivating, 36 “The Impression Ben Made” (Matthews), 29–30 inspirational stories “Chelsea’s Teacher,” 91–94 “From Scribbles to Name Writing,” 208–13 “Igniting a Passion for Learning through Uncovering Children’s Interest,” 116–20 “Look for Rikki Tikki at All Times: The True Story of the Runaway Bunny,” 277–83