258
Learning Together with Young Children
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through, 74–75
children participating in, 74, 185
layering of, for complexity, 71–74,
84–85 learning domain, focus on chosen,
82–83 matching containers for diverse
items, 77
orderly beautiful arrangements, 75
overview, 74–75, 83–85
for part-time programs, 176, 177
repositioning to spark new interest,
81 similar with different attributes,
grouping, 78
size, scale, and levels, 79
suggestive of possible uses, 80
“math snack” table, 187–190
meaning making, learning process
and, 104, 108
meetings, end-of-day, 45
Mejer, Deborah, 7
memories, rituals to create, 48–50
Meriwether, Linda, 188
models, in coaching, 127–128
Montessori, Maria, 90
multilingual programs. See bilingual/
multilingual programs
multiple intelligences
and coaching to learn about
learning, 113
defined, 16
music and, 151
naturalist, 161
relationships as focus and, 35
representation, multiple, 144–149,
160–161 See also digging deeper
multiplicity, observation for, 20
music and singing
digging deeper with, 149–152
end-of-the-day meeting and, 45
Friday ritual of, 39
natural enthusiasm for, 149
teacher taking risks in, 205

N National Association for the Education
of Young Children (NAEYC), 90,
178, 179
Native Americans, humor and, 152
natural world
assessment of interest in, 194–196
deepening learning with, 161–167
time and, 3–4
negotiation, culture of classroom
supporting, 47–48
New, Rebecca, 209
Newcomb, Joan, 55
New Hampshire Technical College
planning, 241
New Zealand, 3, 193–194, 224–228
No Child Left Behind Act, 6
O observation
adapting the curriculum and,
184–185 assessing current foundation for,
213 as core practice, 10
for multiplicity, 20
See also details, attention to
online resources
Early Education Advocates, 210
perspectives, research on, 197
Sound Child Care Solutions, 210
support groups, 204
“Voices of Practitioners,” 210
World Forum Working Groups, 210
open-ended (transformable)
materials, 63–67
ordinary, none are, 96
ordinary moments. See teacher
bringing self to the process
P painting, coaching skills in, 123–124
Paley, Vivian, 146, 210
part-time programs, focus of, 175–178
party planning, spirit of, 48–49
passion, 174
pedagogisti, 17
pedagogy, chart clarifying values and
theory in, 214–215
peers. See connections between
children personification, 152–157
perspective of child
adaptation of curriculum and,
196–199 assessment from, sample
statement of, 228
calling attention to differences
among, 104
magical thinking and, 156
seeking to understand, 96–100
See also children’s ideas and
interests perspective of parents, 197–199
perspective of teachers, conflicting,
199–202 COPYRIGHTED MATERIAL
philosophy. See theoretical influences
photographs for coaching attention to detail,
129–130, 132
for coaching skills with materials,
121 in daily journal, 193
face painting and, 144, 145
of family, 32, 177–178
of new siblings, 70
for part-time toddler play group,
177–178 reflecting children’s ideas using,
170–172 researching child’s perspective
with, 197–198
See also books, making;
documentation physical education, 157
Piaget, Jean, 32, 72, 90, 109
plan/do/review, 47
planning adapting forms, 180–183
sample forms, 232–241
seeking perspectives to inform,
196–199 time for, 17, 183, 184
planting seeds, 50
play, child-initiated
considered invalid, 5
importance of, 5, 111–112
importance of teacher support for,
5–6 master players, 111
presented in opposition to teacher-
directed, 6
types of, 72
See also children’s ideas and
interests; coaching children to
learn about learning; digging
deeper playdough
body movements and, 158–160
layering materials with, 72–74,
84–85 sculpture and, 200
point of view. See perspective of child
power, teacher claiming, 87
adaptation of curriculum and, 175,
185 praxis, 9, 19–20
pretending. See dramas
problems in current approaches
child- and teacher-directed, in
conflict, 6
factories serve as model, 3–4




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infrastructure lacking to support
reflectivity, 6–7
a new way in contrast to, 8
overview, 1–2
philosophical foundations lacking,
4 play not considered valid, 5–6
quality definitions inadequate, 2–3
“research-based” requirement, 7–8
view of children as needing
“readying,” 5
See also adopting the curriculum;
advocacy professional development
English language, 207
problems with in-service training,
4, 17
sustenance and renewal from,
203–204 visits to other programs, 206–207
See also advocacy for change;
responsibility to live fully and
teach well
professional influences, awareness of,
89–90 program infrastructure, 6–7
protective stance, cultural context
and, 90
proximal development, zone of, 15,
111–112, 134
Puget Sound ESD Head Start, 222–223,
234–237 pumpkin project, 70
Q quality
definition of, as inadequate, 2–3
of materials, 67–69, 75
R racism, 6, 90, 174, 230
rage, advocacy and, 209
rat habitats, 154–155
readiness, 5, 6
receptive mindset, cultivation of,
94–96 recycled materials, 63
reflection time
as effective learning source, 170
memory-making and, 49
reflective teaching
adaptation of curriculum and,
184–185 children as participants in, 113
essential elements of self-
development, 19

questions for, 10, 20–21
teacher-proof curricula vs., 11
See also teacher bringing self to the
process Reggio Emilia, 5, 16, 17, 56, 89, 90–91,
190, 209
relationships and explaining “Why?” make
changes, 208
focus on, vs. rules, 35–36, 89
importance of, 23, 178
looping to foster, 23
multiple intelligences and focus
on, 35
social-emotional climate and, 24
Spicy Work and development of,
48 teacher scripts and, 89
See also connections between
children; families
requirements. See mandated
requirements; problems in
current approaches
“research-based” curricula, 7–8
responsibility to live fully and teach
well advocacy for change, 208–210,
244–251 overview, 18–19, 203–204
question “why” to challenge
thinking, 208
suppport, finding colleagues for,
203, 204–205
trying new things, 205–206
visiting inspiring programs,
206–207 See also adopting the curriculum;
teacher bringing self to the
process Reynolds, Gretchen, 111
rhythm of the day, 22
rights of children, advocacy for, 209,
246–247 Rinaldi, Carlina, 90
rituals, 48–53
role model for teacher, 205
roles of teacher
cultural and historical context and,
90–91 range of, 15
sample curriculum statement on,
222 in supporting play, 5–6
Rosegrant, Teresa, 6
routines and rules. See culture of the
classroom COPYRIGHTED MATERIAL
index 259
S scaffolding
and coaching to learn about
learning, 15, 120
defined, 112
with early toddlers, 106–107
environment and routines
supporting, 39
and friends, learning from, 134
group design project and, 45
perspective of children and, 197
scissor skills and, 120
social context of learning and, 90
Spicy Work as, 47–48
values supported by, chart
clarifying, 214
“yes and…” rule and, 140
See also coaching children to learn
about learning
schedule, balancing, 41
scissor skills, 119–120
scope-and-sequence curriculum, 7,
184–185 scripts, teacher, 89, 92, 93
sculptures and conflicts of ideas in teaching,
199–202 stone, 125–126
wire, 124, 144, 200–201
seeds, planting, 50
self. See teacher bringing self to the
process Senge, Peter, 8
sensory base material, 72
Shoptaugh, Sonya, 9
Shore, Rima, 22
silly songs, 151–152
singing. See music and singing
¡Si se puede!, 207
social constructivism, 4, 39, 113
sociocultural theories, 214
socioeconomic status, 6
song. See music and singing
Sound Child Care Solutions, 210,
250–251 Spanish. See bilingual/multilingual
programs Spicy Work, 47–48
standards. See assessment; mandated
requirements; problems in
current approaches
stone sculptures, 125–126
Stone Soup, 3
stories. See dramas; teacher stories
strengths of children. See competence
support groups, for teacher