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Learning Together with Young Children
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III. Therefore, be it known that we, the undersigned, are in agreement that implementation and engagement
standards shall demonstrate inclusion of and respect for:
• The Child’s Right to their Home Language:
English language learners shall not be segregated from the other children except to the very limited degree that
this segregation is strictly for the purposes of enhanced learning opportunities within the Cognitive Domains.

• The Child’s Right to Reasonable Accommodation and Inclusion:
Children with special needs shall not be segregated from the other children except to the very limited degree
that this segregation is strictly for the purposes of enhanced learning opportunities within the Cognitive and
Physical Health and Development Domains.

• The Child’s Right to Individualization:
Children will receive instruction and support in a way that respects their individual pace, learning styles,
abilities, and needs.

• The Child’s Rights to Play:
Children shall have regularly scheduled daily opportunities to engage in child-initiated play, both indoors and
out of doors.

And because the mind of the infant or young child is qualitatively different from the school-age child in terms
of representational intelligence and other related cognitive abilities, we will only administer learning standards
that have been designed specifically for the young child by acknowledged child development professionals and
experts. And because a young child’s cognitive development is built upon a foundation of basic needs that include
social and emotional well-being, we will only administer learning standards that address the whole child. These
standards shall include the following six domains:
• Cognitive development
Language Arts
Science and Inquiry
Mathematics Literacy
• Physical Health and Development
Fine and Gross Motor Skills
Nutrition, Health, Safety, and Body Image
Anti-bias and Inclusion
Active Lifestyle, including Outdoor Environments
• Social and Emotional Development
Self-Concept Self-Control
Cooperation Social Relationships, including Anti-bias and Nonviolence
Self-Esteem and Empowerment
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appendix D
247 • Creativity
Art Dramatic Play
Problem-Solving, including use of Outdoor Environments
• Play
Teacher-directed and Child-directed
Indoor and Outdoor
Physical and Social
Existing in significant blocks of time daily
• Approaches toward learning
Engagement and Persistence
Reasoning and Problem-solving
Initiative and Curiosity
Risk and Challenge
IV. And finally, because the quality of the adult-child relationship is fundamental to the learning process, Learning
Standards implementation strategies must address the need for the continued professional growth and
development of the caregiver and the continued education of family members in matters of child growth and
development, advocacy, and community resources.

In support of the principles and standards set forth in this Manifesto, we, the undersigned, cite the following:
• Code of Ethical Conduct and Statement of Commitment, NAEYC, 1998
• Play Under Siege, Children’s Play: The Roots of Reading, Edward F. Zigler, Sandra J. Bishop-Josef, Zero to Three
Press, Washington, DC, 2004
• IPA and the Declaration of the Child’s Right to Play, The Great Outdoors: Restoring Children’s Right to Play Outside,
Mary S. Rivkin, NAEYC, Washington, DC, 1995
Our strong beliefs are based on the importance of our children’s early care and education, and supported by
research. Our strong stand is necessary to counteract the unrelenting drive toward a standardization of learning and
test-driven assessment that often fails to match the goals and guidelines of a developmentally appropriate early
learning experience.

Our commitment in this matter is solely to the well-being of young children, and not to any institution or
organization. COPYRIGHTED MATERIAL