DOUBLE TAP TO ZOOM WITH PHONE OR TABLET COPYRIGHTED MATERIAL The DOUBLE TAP TO ZOOM WITH PHONE OR TABLET Handbook COPYRIGHTED MATERIAL DOUBLE TAP TO ZOOM WITH PHONE OR TABLET This book is dedicated to all the families, children and teachers I have worked with through the years. COPYRIGHTED MATERIAL DOUBLE TAP TO ZOOM WITH PHONE OR TABLET The Handbook Lisa Murphy COPYRIGHTED MATERIAL DOUBLE TAP TO ZOOM WITH PHONE OR TABLET Published by Redleaf Press 10 Yorkton Court St. Paul, MN 55117 www.redleafpress.org Using Food in the Classroom A position statement by Lisa Murphy © 2001 by Lisa Murphy All rights reserved. Unless otherwise noted on a specific page, no portion of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or capturing on any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher, except by a reviewer, who may quote brief passages in a critical article or review to be printed in a magazine or newspaper, or electronically transmitted on radio, television, or the Internet. OOEY GOOEY ® is a registered trademark of Ooey Gooey Inc. All rights reserved. First edition 2001 Cover and book design by Andrew Curl Interior photos by Lisa Murphy, Michael Griffen, CéCé Canton, and Kimberly Griffen Printed in the United States of America 21 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 The topic of using food in the classroom, and please pardon the pun, can be a sticky issue. I use food in the classroom, but not to be a rebel. I believe certain substances in the sensory tub provide a level of tactile exploration that is necessary for children. I have been known to use beans, rice, cornmeal, flour, pasta, un-popped popcorn kernels, corn syrup, pudding, baking soda, and vinegar. But that’s me, and every point has a counterpoint and every rule has an exception. People are passionate about this subject on both sides of the food aisle. Here’s my basic take on it—If you choose to use food, that’s fine; if you choose not to, that’s also fine. A vast majority of the activities in this book do not use food, a few do. Feel free to substitute nonfood items for food items. Or you can ignore the activity altogether. I respect your decision either way. I have been known to make substitutions and change activities myself! “What’s going on here?!”—Wolf Illustration , © 2002 Michelle Murphy Printed on acid-free paper COPYRIGHTED MATERIAL DOUBLE TAP TO ZOOM WITH PHONE OR TABLET CONTENTS THE JOURNEY BEGINS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . pg 12 CHANGING MY MIND . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . pg 14 BEING READY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . pg 16 TAKING YOUR TIME . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . pg 17 CHILD-CENTERED IS NOT CHAOS! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . pg 19 IDENTIFYING A CHILD-CENTERED ENVIRONMENT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . pg 21 IDENTIFYING CHARACTERISTIC #1 Long Periods of Uninterrupted Free Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . pg 21 IDENTIFYING CHARACTERISTIC #2 Few Restrictions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . pg 27 IDENTIFYING CHARACTERISTIC #3 Adults Acting as Facilitators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . pg 31 I Need Some More Bags! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . pg 33 IDENTIFYING CHARACTERISTIC #4 Lots of Outdoor Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . pg 36 MAKING TIME FOR CHANGE Continuing the Journey . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . pg 40 Ego . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . pg 42 Environment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .pg 44 Experiences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .pg 49 Three Flat Circles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .pg 54 OOEY GOOEY ® ACTIVITIES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .pg 57 Index of Activity Ideas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . pg 128 REFERENCES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . pg 131 CONTACTING LISA MURPHY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . pg 132 COPYRIGHTED MATERIAL 5 DOUBLE TAP TO ZOOM WITH PHONE OR TABLET Acknowledgements: Thank you to Carolyn, Sarah, Judy, Susan, Tami, Kathleen and Tom for your collective wisdom and support, patience and suggestions, editing hours and input as I transferred what was in my head and heart onto paper. Thank you to Cynde for being my mentor and inspiration as I began my journey. Even though you are far away I think of you often. Your stay in California was short and sweet, but I know you were brought out here for a reason. Thank you for being my guide, my friend and my Obi-Wan. made butter on saltines, Mike Mulligan and His Steam Shovel, hours in the mud, books in the bathroom, a clay room, upright pianos, pepper jack cheese, ducks in To Miss Mary— Thank you for back porches, piñatas, real hammers, freshly the yard and a big boat to paint. I do what I do because of you— thank you. 6 COPYRIGHTED MATERIAL DOUBLE TAP TO ZOOM WITH PHONE OR TABLET A Note To You From Lisa….. In her book, Teaching in the Key of Life, author Mimi Bronsky-Chenfeld talks about the “wolves” that are occasionally seen stalking school hallways and lurking around preschool classroom doors. Wolves, by definition, are those concerned types who want to know what children are “doing” all day (read: doing to get ready for kindergarten). They desire to know the rationale for flubber, the developmentally appropriateness of ooblick, the reason for the hokey pokey, the goal of splatter painting, and the objective of swinging on your tummy. They seem to search incessantly for an overall justification of the importance of what we might call “play.” Great will be the day when we no longer have to defend what we do— but for now, we do. Therefore, we must be armed with an arsenal of information. And while we fight as we might to have play valued for it’s own sake, we have the professional responsibility to be able to articulate what is happening when children do play. When children are engaged in meaningful experiences and spend time in environments that emphasize wonder, discovery and creativity, (not the accumulation of a bunch o’facts) “learning” is happening all day long! Unfortunately though, many of us work in environments where there is a lot of pressure for children to be performing, gathering random bits of knowledge and hurrying up to be “ready” for the next expectation with no time left to appreciate the here-and-now. As professionals we must work towards being able to convey our message about the value of play to the “wolves” that come to our door. COPYRIGHTED MATERIAL 7 DOUBLE TAP TO ZOOM WITH PHONE OR TABLET I have found, amazingly enough, that sometimes all it takes are a few strategically placed phrases such as, “when we are squeezing playdough we are strengthening our hands and eventually, when our hands and fingers are strong enough, we are able to hold pencils,” or “when we make ooblick we are exploring the difference between solids and liquids” to ease fears and worries that the children aren’t doing anything. So when it came time to move ahead with the second printing of the Ooey Gooey ® Handbook we asked ourselves, do we simply print off more copies or do we take the time to make some changes and add the “wolf words?” We opted to make the additions and include them in this second printing in order to assist you in articulating what is happening in your classrooms, living rooms, kitchens and family child care homes. Hands-on learning is the most appropriate way for young children to explore and learn about their world. Some people understand this immediately— some do not. Some start out as wolves, questioning, challenging and demanding. Please know that the parents who “get it” might be easier to deal with, but the wolves are on your side too! They just require something more— something different— in order to truly embrace the importance of child-centered environments. They want to know that you know what you are doing! When the children are finger painting and they ask what the children are doing and why, they appreciate it when you are able to go deeper than “it’s so much fun!” Yes, it is fun! However, finger painting also increases small motor 8 COPYRIGHTED MATERIAL DOUBLE TAP TO ZOOM WITH PHONE OR TABLET coordination, facilitates pre-writing skills and serves as a medium for children to progress through the many stages of scribbling. Verbiage fluff? Not to the parent who needs this from you. We need to know our stuff! Really— you DO know these things! It’s just that when we feel on the spot, flustered, or are distracted by twenty children, we might forget. So we included them here to help you remember. At the bottom of each Ooey Gooey ® activity page we have included some of the concepts which can be applied to the experience. This way everyone can continue developing and deepening their understanding of the importance of creating hands-on, child- centered early childhood environments. It is my wish that these additions might assist you as you work together creating magical, engaging places for children and their families. All my best to you. Love, The Ooey Gooey Lady ® October 2002 COPYRIGHTED MATERIAL 9 “What’s going on here?!” © 2002 Michelle Murphy DOUBLE TAP TO ZOOM WITH PHONE OR TABLET 10 COPYRIGHTED MATERIAL DOUBLE TAP TO ZOOM WITH PHONE OR TABLET INTRODUCTION I have dedicated my professional life to creating places where children can simply “be.” Where they can engage in experiences that are meaningful to them and have long periods of uninterrupted free time. Where teachers are encouraged to facilitate, instead of “teach.” Where preschool is not boot camp for kindergarten. Where it is believed that preschoolers do not need bite-sized morsels of an elementary school curriculum and where the curiosity and wonder of childhood is free flowing. I do what I do because of the nursery school experience I had, and I know in my heart of hearts I was put here to give that back. It is my passion, dream, and goal to develop places where children can be immersed in all the things that symbolize childhood: mud, sand, water, paint, blocks, songs, books, frogs, trucks, forts, tree houses, tires and ropes. I am forever creating places that provide children with the time, space, materials, and support they need to simply be children and I hope this book encourages you to do the same. This book was written for everyone who works with children: kindergarten teachers, parents, family child care providers, principals, playgroup captains, administrators, grandparents, teachers’ aides, and preschool teachers. May it assist you as you increase your understanding of what “child-centered” means, as you plan exciting activities for the children in your care and as you create and promote environments that encourage a love of life-long learning. COPYRIGHTED MATERIAL 11 DOUBLE TAP TO ZOOM WITH PHONE OR TABLET THE JOURNEY BEGINS Unofficially, I am a binkie finder, marble painter, cartwheel turner, back patter, song singer, diaper changer, story writer, skinned knee fixer, cold coffee drinker, PBJ eater, problem solver, hand holder, paint cup filler, grass stain fighter, tree climber, block builder, puddle splasher, hokey pokey dancer, and mud pie baker. Officially, I am a teacher. I became a teacher because of one particular woman. Miss Mary. Miss Mary owned a Nursery School in Livermore, California. And, in the early 1970’s, I was fortunate to have been one of her students. I can remember my days at Mary’s better than I can remember days at junior high and even high school! While I was studying Early Childhood Education in college, there was never any doubt in my mind that I was put here on this earth to give what I got back. My vision of Early Childhood Education meant being able to create places where children could have the same adventure filled mornings I was fortunate enough to have had. Mornings filled with painting, clay, blocks, songs, stories, mud pies, dress up, big shovels and real hammers, bikes, water, lots of outdoor time, and plenty of open-ended experiences within hours of free play. Upon graduation from college I quickly learned that the idealism of Mary’s had been replaced by the reality of day care. I showed up for my 12 COPYRIGHTED MATERIAL DOUBLE TAP TO ZOOM WITH PHONE OR TABLET first day of teaching preschool and was told to have my lesson plans and ditto request form on the director’s desk every Friday by noon. In addition, I was “teamed up” with a teacher who had a timer to tell the children when to “switch” activities, thick rows of masking tape line-up lines all over the floor, name tags on the children, a “think about it chair,” a whistle around her neck, and lesson plans that were laminated from 1975. Giving back what I got was not going to be as easy as I thought. I wondered both aloud and silently where the easels were, wondered why we only had thirty minutes of outside time when the children were often there for six, eight, eleven hours, and wondered why we had to do dittos. I shared a few of my concerns and thoughts with the other teachers, and was told, “Lisa, we have to do curriculum now to get the kids ready for kindergarten! Make sure you send an art project home each day, but be sure not to let them get too dirty — always use the smocks. Make some name tags for the lunch table, and always label your bulletin boards, the parents want to know what they did each day. And, oh, at nap time, never rub backs for more than ten minutes— it throws the lunches off. Be sure to come in from the play yard when your time is up and make sure they don’t have too much ‘center time’— you can’t just let them play all day, face it Lisa, it’s not the 70’s anymore— you better just get with the program.” And because I lacked the strength and confidence to question what they told me, I did what they told me to do. COPYRIGHTED MATERIAL 13 DOUBLE TAP TO ZOOM WITH PHONE OR TABLET I made masking tape line-up lines and name tags for the children to show them where to sit for circle time and lunch. I said things like, “Shh, be quiet,” “Inside voices please,” and “Stop running.” I had beautiful bulletin boards (that I created) covered with product oriented art, I followed my schedule , and had laminated STOP signs to tell the children when a certain area of the classroom was “closed” and “off limits.” I planned curriculum based around weekly themes and monthly holidays and sang a whole bunch of songs that were all to the tune of “Jingle Bells” and “Row Row Row Your Boat.” It took three years of “getting with the program” before I realized that the program wasn’t working for me or for the children. The journey of “changing my mind” took a long time, journeys usually do. I started to question everything I did. I wondered how my actions, words, and behaviors impacted the children. I wondered how I influenced and/or stifled their curiosity, creativity, and sense of wonder. Was I really giving back what I had experienced at Mary’s? Or, had I sold out to the pressure of getting with the program? CHANGING MY MIND 14 I answered my own question during a frenzied fall morning when my new team teacher, Cynde, watched me go crazy while I attempted to complete a “small-medium-large” project I had planned for the children. Of course, COPYRIGHTED MATERIAL DOUBLE TAP TO ZOOM WITH PHONE OR TABLET since it was October, I had spent the previous evening cutting out various sizes of orange construction paper “pumpkins” so that I could teach twelve, three -year -olds about size by having them glue the pumpkins on their paper in order from big to little. I brought the pumpkins (and even the little green stems) into class and began telling the children how to do it, but all they wanted to do was squeeze the glue out! They were not doing it “right” and I was getting very frustrated! My lesson plans said that today we were going to learn about “small- medium-large” but all these children wanted to learn about was how to empty glue bottles! I was going to use this project to decorate the bulletin board! But how was I going to fill up the holiday board with this holiday art if all they wanted to do was pile the pumpkins all on top of one another? The projects didn’t even look right! You couldn’t even tell that they were pumpkins! I was still getting upset. To make it worse, while the kids were “creating,” I kept saying things like, “NO NO NO NO! STOP STOP STOP! YOU ARE USING TOO MUCH GLUE— HERE, WATCH ME!” I was totally and completely destroying any shred of creativity this project ever had. The children were getting up and leaving the art table. Who can blame them? They were determined to find something in the room that actually interested them. I was frantically cutting out more pumpkins and more stems, begging the children to “please come back and make one more. It’s for the board! Come make one for your mom!” when Cynde stood up. She COPYRIGHTED MATERIAL 15 DOUBLE TAP TO ZOOM WITH PHONE OR TABLET walked over to me, and calmly said, “I could never understand why a teacher would spend more time preparing a project than the children would actually spend doing it.” I stopped. I looked up from my cutting, directly at her. I glanced over at her children. They were all engaged, painting at the easel, building with Legos and blocks, reading books, coloring with crayons and paper, and playing dress-up. I looked at my children. They were running around the room. I was begging them to come back to the table to “make one more,” hollering at them to just use “a little bit of glue” and to “watch me,” so they would do it right. In the middle of it all Cynde was quite literally telling me to “cut it out!” A light bulb went off in my head and I had my first career changing AH-HA! BEING READY If you take what Cynde said out of context, it wasn’t anything major or profound. What she said made an impact because I WAS FINALLY READY TO HEAR IT. I’ll never know how many gems she placed in my path prior to that moment, because up until that time, I simply was not ready to receive them. It is said that when the student is ready, the teacher will appear. I was finally ready and Cynde was there for me. She guided and assisted me as I began the journey of rediscovering the teaching style that was in my heart. 16 COPYRIGHTED MATERIAL DOUBLE TAP TO ZOOM WITH PHONE OR TABLET TAKING YOUR TIME In the movie Star Wars, Obi Wan Kanobi says to Luke Skywalker, “You have taken your first step into a larger world.” This statement also rings true for us as we start our journey leading into the world of child-centered teaching. More than likely, you will not read this book and say, “That’s it! I did it! I’m so child-centered!” The journey takes time. It involves a lot of self exploration. We must examine the ideas, values, attitudes, likes, dislikes, etc, that we bring along with us. Becoming child-centered means questioning, reading, examining, challenging, and rethinking what we have always been doing. Take baby steps. If you do too much too soon you will get frustrated. If some of the activities and philosophical concepts presented in this book are new for you, do not start changing everything on Monday morning! Take your time. Don’t rush it. At the same time, if you find you are doing something right now that you just can’t believe you’ve been doing, and you say to yourself, “Oh my gosh I can’t believe that I do that!” and you want to stop doing it, then do just that, STOP it. Don’t feel guilty, just cut it out! If I continued to brood about all the years I said things like, “sit-still-be- quiet-hands-home-get-in-line-inside-voices-stop-running-get-out-of-the- water” I’d be miserable. I refer to my first few years of teaching, as “before I knew better.” Give yourself permission to change your mind. COPYRIGHTED MATERIAL 17 DOUBLE TAP TO ZOOM WITH PHONE OR TABLET I realize that some of you reading this are not in the position to start making major changes within your environment. Teaching is a cooperative effort between teachers, co-teachers, aides, helpers, assistants, parents, administration, directors, principals, and owners. Rules, policies, and guidelines within preschools are often NOT created by the people working with the children. If your floor is carpeted, your director or owner might be concerned about easel painting, playing with playdough or having a water table. If you share a space with another group or organization there may be concerns about cleanliness or cleanup policies. If you have a team teacher with a different teaching style than you, there may be objections and questions to some of the activities presented in the curriculum portion of the book. Do the best you can while still growing, changing, and continuing on your journey. 18 COPYRIGHTED MATERIAL DOUBLE TAP TO ZOOM WITH PHONE OR TABLET Activities COPYRIGHTED MATERIAL 57 DOUBLE TAP TO ZOOM WITH PHONE OR TABLET MONOPRINTS You Need: Paint Paper A table you can easily wipe off Color Mixing Small Motor Skills Stages of Scribbling Creativity Print Making Directions: Put some paint directly on a table. Allow the children to fingerpaint on the table. When they are finished, let them put a piece of paper on top of their fingerpainting, press it flat, and lift it up. It will take a print of the fingerprint design they made on the table. Clean up: Use sponges and squeegees to clean up. Allow the kids to help too! Suggestion: Toddlers can do this one right at the high chair! 58 COPYRIGHTED MATERIAL DOUBLE TAP TO ZOOM WITH PHONE OR TABLET COZY SPOTS You Need: Tables with sheets over them Cardboard boxes Pillows and old sheets A squared off corner Directions: Use available objects and materials to assist you in creating a cozy spot, nook or cranny for the children within your environment. The children will often times create them themselves. Allow them. Refueling Time Taking a “Break” Cozy Corners Where “You Can’t See Me!” (But You Can!) Socialization Language Development Helpful Hint: Don’t save these forts and secret hiding spots for rainy days! Have cozy spots available for the children all the time. Solicit ideas and suggestions from the children too! Our book area is by an old wooden crate. The crate is filled with pillows and covered with an old quilt. Quite cozy indeed! COPYRIGHTED MATERIAL 59 DOUBLE TAP TO ZOOM WITH PHONE OR TABLET SWINGING ON YOUR TUMMY PAINTING You Need: Swings Paper (a long sheet of mural or butcher works best here) Paint Paint cups Brushes Directions: Lay the paper under the swing. Put the paint cups and brushes close by. Allow the children to swing on their tummies and paint at the same time! Large and Small Motor Development Even teachers get into the action! Pre-writing, Creativity Coordination and Balance 60 COPYRIGHTED MATERIAL EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION DOUBLE TAP TO ZOOM WITH PHONE OR TABLET The ® Handbook T he Ooey Gooey ® Handbook is a MUST READ for anyone who spends time with children. Preschool teachers, family child care providers, playgroup leaders, parents , and grandparents alike will all benefit from the ideas, suggestions, tips , and inspiration contained within The Ooey Gooey ® Handbook. v O e n r ds 6 -o 5 t n side play a ou h nd creating nce , a t r a , sci i e ty ideas fo m r ents both activ ing environ nd at engag at home o a ol! sch In addition to being a dynamic and passionate speaker, Lisa Murphy has the ability to refuel parents and teachers with the energy they need to return to their homes and classrooms and do what is right for the children. Lisa’ s current project is assisting educators in linking hands-on, play-based programs to the educational requirements in various states. She is committed to showing parents and teachers how playing is “getting them ready” for school! Lisa has recently moved to upstate New York with her husband Tom and their dog Otis. They live in a magical old farm house and continue to conduct grand gooey experiments in their kitchen and barn! This is Lisa ’ s first book. COPYRIGHTED MATERIAL ISBN 978-1-60554-379-6 $19.95