’ DOUBLE TAP TO ZOOM WITH PHONE OR TABLET A GROUP LEARNING (UN)CURRICULUM JEFF A. JOHNSON DENITA DINGER COPYRIGHTED MATERIAL DOUBLE TAP TO ZOOM WITH PHONE OR TABLET LET’S ALL PLAY COPYRIGHTED MATERIAL DOUBLE TAP TO ZOOM WITH PHONE OR TABLET Other Redleaf Press Books by Jeff A. Johnson and Denita Dinger Let’s Play: (Un)Curriculum Early Learning Adventures Let Them Play: An Early Learning (Un)Curriculum COPYRIGHTED MATERIAL DOUBLE TAP TO ZOOM WITH PHONE OR TABLET LET’S ALL PLAY A Group Learning (Un)Curriculum Jeff A. Johnson and Denita Dinger COPYRIGHTED MATERIAL DOUBLE TAP TO ZOOM WITH PHONE OR TABLET Published by Redleaf Press 10 Yorkton Court St. Paul, MN 55117 www.redleafpress.org © 2015 by Jeff A. Johnson and Denita Dinger All rights reserved. Unless otherwise noted on a specific page, no portion of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or capturing on any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher, except by a reviewer, who may quote brief passages in a critical article or review to be printed in a magazine or newspaper, or electronically transmitted on radio, television, or the Internet. First edition 2015 Cover design by Jim Handrigan Cover photograph by STEFANOLUNARDI/iStock/ThinkStock Interior design by Ryan Scheife, Mayfly Design Typeset in the Alberta MT and Myriad Pro typefaces Printed in the United States of America 21 20 19 18 17 16 15 14   1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data Johnson, Jeff A., 1969- Let's all play : a group-learning (un)curriculum / Jeff A. Johnson, Denita Dinger. pages cm Summary: "Let's All Play provides all-new adventures that support children's social skill development through thoughtful group play, interaction, and conversation. This book also encourages you to reflect on the value of children's play through deep thinking activities"— Provided by publisher. ISBN 978-1-60554-364-2 (paperback) 1. Play—United States. 2. Early childhood education—United States. 3. Early childhood education—Curricula—United States. I. Dinger, Denita. II. Title. LB1139.35.P55J65 2015 790.0973—dc23 2014019838 Printed on acid-free paper COPYRIGHTED MATERIAL DOUBLE TAP TO ZOOM WITH PHONE OR TABLET To mistakes, failures, patience, and tenacity, for without them I would have missed so many opportunities —Denita To Tasha, my One True Love and favorite playmate —Jeff COPYRIGHTED MATERIAL DOUBLE TAP TO ZOOM WITH PHONE OR TABLET The human brain is an apparatus, first and foremost, for dealing with the social environment. —Judith Rich Harris, The Nurture Assumption: Why Children Turn Out the Way They Do Abundant research exists on the importance of social skills for success in school. “Whole” children attend school; they don’t just send their brains along. Nurturing children’s social and emotional skills in preschool enables them to profit from school instruction. Children who thrive in preschool are prepared to become members of a classroom community where the individual’s needs come after the needs of the group—a tough lesson for young children. Children who do well in preschool listen to directions, pay attention, solve disputes with words, and focus on tasks without constant supervision. Recent research suggests that they learn these skills through playful activities. —Kathy Hirsh-Pasek, Roberta Michnick Golinkoff, Laura E. Berk, and Dorothy G. Singer, A Mandate for Playful Learning in Preschool: Presenting the Evidence COPYRIGHTED MATERIAL DOUBLE TAP TO ZOOM WITH PHONE OR TABLET Contents Acknowledgments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ix Introduction: Social Play . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Chapter 1: Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Chapter 21: Child-Led Games . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 Chapter 2: Foil Rivers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Chapter 22: Cup Blocks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 Chapter 3: Delayed Gratification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Chapter 23: Hero Play . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87 Chapter 4: Catch It! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Chapter 24: Magnet Wall . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 Chapter 5: Expectations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Chapter 25: Mud Kitchen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 Chapter 6: Loose Parts Play . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Chapter 26: Fizzing Trail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96 Chapter 7: Open Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Chapter 27: Planned Scarcity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99 Chapter 8: Funnel and Tube Frame . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Chapter 28: Frozen Sculptures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102 Chapter 9: Rough-and-Tumble Play . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Chapter 29: Support Failure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 Chapter 10: Stretch and Pop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Chapter 30: Flashlight Bling with Some Cling . . . 108 Chapter 11: Sudsational Play . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 Chapter 31: Sticky Side Out . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111 Chapter 12: What If . . . ? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 Chapter 32: Dramatic Play . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115 Chapter 13: Pump Play . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 Chapter 33: Saturation Experimentation . . . . . . . . 118 Chapter 14: The Suspended Branch of Play . . . . . . 53 Chapter 34: Problem Solving . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122 Chapter 15: Self-Regulation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Chapter 35: Chip Clips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125 Chapter 16: Magnet Mittens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 Chapter 36: Mix It Up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128 Chapter 17: Risk Assessment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 Chapter 37: Dribble Painting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131 Chapter 18: Slingshots . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 Chapter 38: Projects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135 Chapter 19: Yes . . . And . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74 Chapter 39: Double-Handled Paintbrushes . . . . . 139 Chapter 20: Sock Sandbags . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78 Chapter 40: Rewards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142 Conclusion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145 Social Play Terminology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147 Suggested Reading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151 COPYRIGHTED MATERIAL DOUBLE TAP TO ZOOM WITH PHONE OR TABLET COPYRIGHTED MATERIAL DOUBLE TAP TO ZOOM WITH PHONE OR TABLET Acknowledgments Thanks to photographer Leslie Dionne (you’re a FWP, Leslie!), Sachelle Fidler, and the rest of the gang at Little Munchkins Preschool Center for their help with pho- tos. Thanks to Brittney Mendiola and Cheryl Mendiola at Tuggy’s Tots Preschool for the photos they provided. Thanks to Lori Atchison of Lori Atchison Photog- raphy (www.latchphoto.com) for the photos she provided. Thanks to the gang at Redleaf Press for letting us do another book together. Thanks to all the folks who’ve supported our previous efforts and helped with this project. Thank you to my dad for encouraging me to chase my dreams and for teaching me the importance of optimism, relationships, and a full tank. —Denita Thanks to Tasha, Starbucks, and rum. —Jeff ix COPYRIGHTED MATERIAL DOUBLE TAP TO ZOOM WITH PHONE OR TABLET COPYRIGHTED MATERIAL DOUBLE TAP TO ZOOM WITH PHONE OR TABLET Introduction: Social Play We humans are social creatures. We are driven to connect and interact with each other. Our brains need social contact. Social skills are skills we will use throughout the entirety of our lives, yet in many early learning settings, play—the primary way young children practice and hone skills—is disappearing and being replaced with an unrelenting rush to early academics in preparation for school and the high-pressure, high-stakes testing that drives it. Social skills are vital because they help kids prepare not only for all the human-to-human interactions to come in their lives but also for school. Importantly, not only do cognitive and social skills reinforce one another, but social skills can actually lead to better cognitive skills, especially for children with average cognitive abilities. Children with advanced social skills may be better at getting additional information from teachers, understanding others’ points of view, cooperating with teachers and peers, and displaying initiative in the classroom. A large body of research documenting the predictive value of preschool children’s social maturity for later school success indicates that school readiness should not be assessed just in terms of cognitive attainments but also in terms of social attainments that forecast children’s adjustment to formal schooling. —Kathy Hirsh-Pasek, Roberta Michnick Golinkoff, Laura E. Berk, and Dorothy G. Singer, A Mandate for Playful Learning in Preschool: Presenting the Evidence Ask a few kindergarten teachers: most likely, they’ll say they are more con- cerned with social skills than academic skills. 1 COPYRIGHTED MATERIAL DOUBLE TAP TO ZOOM WITH PHONE OR TABLET When kindergarten teachers are surveyed about their students, they say that the biggest problem they face is not children who don’t know their letters and numbers; it is kids who don’t know how to manage their tem- pers or calm themselves down after a provocation. —Paul Tough, How Children Succeed: Grit, Curiosity, and the Hidden Power of Character This book is about playful ways to support children while they develop and practice social skills. It is a follow-up to our 2012 book, Let Them Play: An Early Learning (Un)Curriculum, and our 2013 book, Let’s Play: (Un)Curriculum Early Learning Adventures, and is intended for early learning professionals and families who want to support hands-on, child-led, play-based learning. It helps adults accustomed to rigidly structured, adult-led early learning curriculum ease into an (un)curricu- lum that supports good old-fashioned play and trusts kids as learners. Easing into an (un)curriculum is important, because for many people, the idea of giving up control and letting children lead is very scary. Think of the following information as the book’s FAQ page. If an (un)curricu- lum is new to you, the FAQs will bring you up to speed. What is an (un)curriculum? An (un)curriculum is hands-on, child-led, play-based learning supported by the preparation, encouragement, and facilitation of an adult. Here are the principles of an (un)curriculum: yy An (un)curriculum is supported by brain-development research. yy An (un)curriculum nurtures the individual child. yy An (un)curriculum sees everything as a learning opportunity. yy In an (un)curriculum, the job of the caregiver is to see learning moments and make the most of them, building on the child’s prior knowledge and life experience. yy An (un)curriculum is based on children’s needs, likes, and interests. yy In an (un)curriculum, great care is taken by adults to ensure that all aspects of the program are geared toward supporting the unique needs of individual children. yy An (un)curriculum supports children’s autonomy. yy In an (un)curriculum, children are trusted as learners. yy A commitment to play is the defining feature of an (un)curriculum. 2      Introduction: Social Play COPYRIGHTED MATERIAL DOUBLE TAP TO ZOOM WITH PHONE OR TABLET You can learn more about this in our book Let Them Play: An Early Learning (Un)Curriculum. What are the four Ts and why are they important? The four Ts are: yy Tasks—what children choose to do to engage themselves yy Time—how children choose to spend their time yy Technique—how children choose to perform tasks yy Team—who children choose to associate with The four Ts are important because by giving children control of these ele- ments, you show them they are trusted as capable, thinking, engaged learners. Author Daniel H. Pink argues in his book Drive: The Surprising Truth about What Motivates Us that adults who have control of the four Ts are happier and productive workers. The same goes for children—the four Ts are empowering. How will this book help me support social development and other learning? The activities and projects in this book are social lubricants that stimulate play, interaction, and conversation. These things lead to learning. As children engage with the ideas we put forth in this book, they also engage with each other and the world around them—which leads to learning. What ages are the projects and activities in this book designed for? We recommend them for kids in the two-and-a-half to six-year-old age range. Slightly younger and older kids will enjoy them as well, although you may need to make modifications based on the developmental level of the children. How should the projects and activities in this book be introduced to kids? We recommend simply plopping the opportunities into the children’s environ- ment. We introduced the term plop in our book Let Them Play. Plopping is the act of placing an activity, opportunity, or idea into an early learning environment Introduction: Social Play      3 COPYRIGHTED MATERIAL DOUBLE TAP TO ZOOM WITH PHONE OR TABLET so that children can discover it, play with it, explore it, and learn from it on their own, in their own way. You can plop things in the middle of the room for easy and immediate discovery, or you can plop them on a shelf for eventual discovery. Plops can happen any time of the day and in any place. The key is to step back and observe once you’ve plopped the plop. Note that just because something is plopped does not guarantee children will choose to engage with it. Why should I step back? The simple act of giving kids some space and not hovering shows them you trust them as competent and capable learners. We recommend you step back and allow the children to lead their own play, exploration, and discovery. You also put your- self in a great position to observe the unique curriculum that flows from each child. How far you step back depends on things like how old the children are, how well you know them, how tired or hungry they are, how many of them there are, how well they know each other, and what materials are involved. For example, you can back off a lot more with a pair of schoolagers who have played together since they were three years old than you can with a half-dozen hungry and tired toddlers. Stepping back does not mean abandoning the children. You need to be nearby to ensure their safety and support their play as needed. How should I organize the kids when we do a new activity? We suggest you allow for child-led self-organization whenever possible. Back in the day, kids were good at self-organizing (“bubble gum, bubble gum, in a dish . . .”). Trust kids with this task and support their efforts as needed. How involved should kids be with preparing the projects? As involved as possible. Let the kids lead. Allow them to own the doing. The more they do, the more they learn. What if kids do it wrong? Don’t worry if kids take the activities we suggest in different directions. The activities are starting points, and there is no wrong way for their play to unfold. Remember, play is in the child, not the toy. Kids will bring their own experience, thought processes, creativity, and knowledge base to the materials. That means 4      Introduction: Social Play COPYRIGHTED MATERIAL DOUBLE TAP TO ZOOM WITH PHONE OR TABLET play can unfold in lots of different ways. We suggest you step back and enjoy the journey while ensuring everyone’s health and safety. Let play evolve. Embrace spontaneity, throw caution to the wind, and go with it! No matter where they take the play, children will learn something of value. What if I get a feeling a child is experiencing some sort of developmental delay? If you feel a child is experiencing some sort of delay in their development, speak up. Talk to the child’s parent, voice your concern, and take advantage of commu- nity resources that support families in this situation. How can I support kids who are new to child-led play and exploration? Here are a few simple ideas: yy Pair them with an older child who has lots of play experience. yy Model play for the child yourself. yy Remember the value of baby steps. Help the child ease into self-led play. yy Offer encouraging words and supportive conversation when they try new things. (“I like how you tried the fingerpaints. How did it feel to paint with your fingers?” or “I see you were building with the card- board boxes. What were you making?”) Why are some of the book’s activities just for adults? We feel it is important for adults who live and work with children to step back from time to time and think about their process and practices—to contemplate their policies and choices—so we included chapters that we see as thought adven- tures for adults. It is good to take time once in a while to think about how you approach different topics. Look at these chapters as starting points for evaluating your approach to the topics discussed. What are baby steps and why should I take them? Baby steps are small, slow, mindful steps. Many times we adults want to rush in and make big changes or try lots of new things when we are exposed to new ideas. Introduction: Social Play      5 COPYRIGHTED MATERIAL DOUBLE TAP TO ZOOM WITH PHONE OR TABLET This can often lead to chaos, leave us feeling overwhelmed, and end in frustration. When we encourage baby steps, we are asking that you slow down and be mind- ful about the way you introduce new play opportunities. How else can I support child-led play? Here are a few suggestions: yy Stay out of the limelight. Don’t make yourself the center of the chil- dren’s attention or take over the play. Be close enough to offer support and to ensure safety, but far enough away that the kids don’t feel like you’re hovering. yy Be organized. Know where your materials are and be able to get to them when they’re needed. Part of your job is anticipating what the children may ask for so you can grab it in an instant when the children do ask for it. Focus on the experience. Don’t get too wrapped up in trying to ensure that kids are developing specific skills. Early learning is about shared experiences and emotional relationships, so focus on the experiences these projects and activities provide rather than on any one skill set, concept, idea, or fact. In the long run, we seldom remember the moments we learned specific skills or facts. If we remember anything about our learning, we remember the experience—who we were with, what we were doing, or how the new idea or concept clicked in our head. Observe and document. Take photos and video and even capture audio recordings of kids involved in play so you can share what they learn with the parents in your program. Do you offer any ongoing support for people trying to create (un)curriculums and support child-led play? Sure we do. We feel it is our job to support our readers after they finish our books. Check out the conclusion to learn how to connect with us. We would love to hear from you. Now go play! 6      Introduction: Social Play COPYRIGHTED MATERIAL DOUBLE TAP TO ZOOM WITH PHONE OR TABLET 1 Choice Overview It could be argued that learning to make mindful choices is one of the primary purposes of childhood. Throughout human history children have traditionally played at the work of the adults in their community—hunter, gatherer, caregiver, leader, healer—and in turn at the choice making these adults engage in. (“The wind is coming from the north. I need to loop around the forest and approach the wild boar in the clearing from the south so he is less likely to smell me coming.”) In addition to playing at adult choice making, children have traditionally had oppor- tunities for more real choice making in their own lives. Throughout most of human history, adults have been too busy with things like finding food, shelter, and water and defending their families from danger to pay much attention to their children, let alone turn into helicopter parents. There was not a lot of parental hovering in the thirteenth century, and that meant kids were trusted with making real choices from a very early age. 7 COPYRIGHTED MATERIAL DOUBLE TAP TO ZOOM WITH PHONE OR TABLET Over the past fifty years, opportunities to play at adult choice making and to experience real-world choice making have dwindled for children. In some cases, children are now told what to do, when to do it, and how it is to be done by well-meaning adults throughout the whole of their days. “Sally, it’s time for you to put the baby dolls away and move to the block area with Kenny. Remember, you two: no throwing blocks, and no towers taller than your waist. That’s just too dangerous.” The problem with this decrease in child choice is that kids who don’t have much practice making choices turn into young adults who don’t have much experi- ence making choices. Finally finishing school and entering the real world become overwhelming for young people faced with the onslaught of decisions that come with adulthood. The human brain is an apparatus, first and foremost, for dealing with the social environment. —Judith Rich Harris, The Nurture Assumption: Why Children Turn Out the Way They Do 8      Chapter 1 COPYRIGHTED MATERIAL DOUBLE TAP TO ZOOM WITH PHONE OR TABLET Why It’s Important Life is a never-ending series of choices: “Should I eat this donut or this carrot?” “Paper or plastic?” “Sleep in or get to work early?” “Drive in this storm or wait for it to pass?” Childhood is prime time for practicing at such decisions. When adults, no matter how well intentioned, always make decisions for a child, the child misses out on chances to practice decision making—as well as to learn from the consequences of his choices, good and bad. Becoming good at making choices can take a lot of practice, and we hinder children when we limit their opportunities. Not allowing children to make their own choices also impacts their sense of self, their feelings of control over their own lives, their autonomy, and their need for power. These things can cause stress and lead to behavior problems. Kids who feel they have no control over their choices often act out defiantly as a way to gain some control and power. The choices we make for ourselves as adults chart the entire course of our lives. It’s important to support children as they learn to make theirs. How to Support It You can support children’s choice making in your early learning setting by taking these actions: 1. Provide large blocks of time where children are free to make their own choices about what and how they play. 2. Create opportunities for real-world choice making. This can be as sim- ple as letting a child decide whether she needs to wear a hat when she heads outside to play. 3. Trust their choices. Allowing a child to make a choice and then talking the child out of it because you don’t agree with it undermines the child’s choice making. Obviously, you have to step in and be the adult in situations involving real danger (“No, you can’t jump from the second-story window with that paper parachute duct-taped to your back!”), but holding your tongue and trusting them to own their choices—good and bad—will help children learn to make better decisions. 4. Allow mistakes. Learning to make good choices requires making some bad choices—and then living with the consequences. This could mean allowing a child to have cold ears for a while when he chooses not to wear a hat out to play on a chilly day. Choice     9 COPYRIGHTED MATERIAL DOUBLE TAP TO ZOOM WITH PHONE OR TABLET Questions to Ask Yourself 1. How do you feel when you notice that other people are taking control of choices that affect your life? 2. Which of your choices hinder kids from making more of their own choices? 3. What three things can you change in your early learning setting to support more child-led choice? Notes _________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________ Now continue on to the next chapter, and flow down a river of foil . . . 10      Chapter 1 COPYRIGHTED MATERIAL DOUBLE TAP TO ZOOM WITH PHONE OR TABLET . . Foı l Rı vers 2 Overview In this project, kids create rivers using aluminum foil and water and then splish and splash as they float items down the channels they’ve created. Constructing foil rivers requires plenty of cooperation, self-regulation, and problem solving. It’s also a play-based opportunity to learn some physical-science concepts and practice language skills. Ingredients aluminum foil (the heavy-duty stuff is best) floaties—stuff to sail down the foil river: paper scraps, tissue, flower petals, bits of yarn, and so on water Let Them Own Discoveries Process 1. Rip a long length of foil from the roll. 2. Lay the foil on an inclined surface. Driveways work great. 3. Carefully fold the long sides of the foil over on themselves a few times to create edges for the river as pictured on the next page. 4. Add water and floaties, step back, and let the kids Resist the urge to show. Stop demon- strating how. Trust your littles (a.k.a. child care crew) to figure out what to do with whatever new, bright, and shiny object has been plopped in their environment. Own- ing discoveries is empowering. Empow- ered children try new things, aren’t afraid to fail, think outside the box, wonder, make predictions, and have a strong sense of self. play. 11 COPYRIGHTED MATERIAL DOUBLE TAP TO ZOOM WITH PHONE OR TABLET More Play Adventures Build dams. Foil, clay, mud, and other materi- als can be used to dam and change the course of a foil river. Add color. Use liquid watercolor or food color- ing to add color to your foil river. Construct a lake. Challenge children to use foil to build a lake for their river to flow into. Try tributaries. See if kids can make two, three, or more small rivers flow into a big river. Fabricate waterfalls. Can the kids figure out how to add a waterfall or two to their foil river? 12      Chapter 2 COPYRIGHTED MATERIAL DOUBLE TAP TO ZOOM WITH PHONE OR TABLET Notes _________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________ Try delaying gratification. See if you can hold off turning the page for five minutes . . . Foil Rivers      13 COPYRIGHTED MATERIAL 40 DOUBLE TAP TO ZOOM WITH PHONE OR TABLET EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION / ACTIVITIES ALL-NEW group learning adventures WHEN CHILDREN PLAY TOGETHER, THEY LEARN TOGETHER. Social skills— including the abilities to self-regulate, interact with others in positive ways, and express empathy—enhance all facets of early learning and are used throughout life. One of the best ways to support the development of these important social skills is to give children open-ended opportunities to play and engage with their peers. Use the early learning adventures in this (un)curriculum to encourage hands-on, child-led group learning and nurture richer, more meaningful play. Each activity includes an overview and a budget-friendly materials list, lays out the process, and provides plenty of adaptions and extensions. More importantly, the activities allow children to learn on their own and in their own ways as they play together and explore the world around them. In addition, this book includes deep thinking activities for you—thought-provokers that encourage reflection on the practices used in your early childhood setting. What kind of learning will unfold when you let children play? Dig deeper into the (un)curriculum early learning principles presented in Let Them Play, and explore more play-based learning adventures in Let’s Play. “Jeff and Denita have done it again! Let’s All Play makes us think about the importance of play and gives us stimulating hands-on activities that can be done with groups of young children. From thought-provoking questions at the end of each section to practical advice on how to support children as they play, this book has it all!” —Tracy Hinton, Oklahoma Family Child Care Provider Jeff A. Johnson has more than twenty years of early childhood education experience and is a popular keynote speaker and trainer. He is the author of eight Redleaf Press books. Denita Dinger was a family child care provider for sixteen years and now operates a small play school. She leads trainings across the country and frequently keynotes early childhood conferences. She is the coauthor of three Redleaf Press books. ISBN 978-1-60554-364-2 COPYRIGHTED MATERIAL $17.95