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COPYRIGHTED MATERIAL “No matter where you are on your journey toward promoting play in early childhood, you will find invaluable ideas inside the pages of this book—from messy to non-messy, from simple to complex, from music to science to literacy, and more. Jeff and Denita have included a treasure trove of ideas to challenge and intrigue children and adults alike. This is a must-have for book- shelves (and, more importantly, in the hands) of parents, caregivers, and teachers of young children.” —Stacey Feehan, preschool teacher, mom, and promoter of play “As a speech language pathologist working with multicultural children—children with learning disabilities, in particular—I know that play-based therapy engages children. It can be the best way to observe children’s sensory, motor, and cognitive abilities. Let’s Play explains the rich com- plexity of spontaneous play and its opportunities for learning and rehabilitation.” —Paola Orlando, speech language pathologist “I was scanning the table of contents, and when I got to chapter twenty, I said to myself, ‘This is going to be an incredible book of fun.’ I was right! Thirty-nine chapters of ‘bodies and brains engaged’ play experiences and oozing over with fun! Reflective, intentional teachers, those who like to fly by the seat of their pants, and every teaching style in between will find something wonderful to experience with children in Let’s Play. The book list at the end of each chapter is a bonus!” —Joyce Mahl, child care consultant “Let’s Play is just the advocate child-led learning has been waiting for. The fresh, open-ended ideas are presented with wit and encouragement and are manageable enough that anyone can implement them into play time with children.” —Denise Milley, special education developmental teacher “I’ve been anticipating this book ever since reading Let Them Play. I’ve been gradually shifting to an open-ended play-based experience for my group, so I love the ideas presented in this book. They are inexpensive, easy to gather, and mostly readily available. I also like that each idea tied into what the children were learning. There were a few ideas—worms—that would push my comfort zone, but I know they’re all activities the children will LOVE!”  —Shannon Grant, family child care provider COPYRIGHTED MATERIAL