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it? (Consider the assumption of superiority—the unexamined idea that one’s own ways are natural or right.) Goal 3 Foster each child’s ability to recognize bias and injustice. This means creating conditions for children to develop the knowledge and analytical skills to identify unfair and untrue images (stereotypes), comments (teasing, name-calling), and behaviors (discrimination) di- rected at one’s own or another’s identity. It means knowing that bias hurts. Discussion Questions • Recall an early memory of an image, comment, or behavior directed at your identity that was untrue or unfair. Describe how you came to realize it was an unfair or untrue stereotype, prejudice, or form of discrimination. How did this realization feel? • Recall an early memory of an image, comment, or behavior directed at someone else’s identity that was untrue or unfair. Describe how you came to realize it was an unfair or untrue stereotype, prejudice, or form of discrimination. • Recall a time when you resisted attempts to help you recog- nize an untrue or unfair stereotype, prejudice, or form of dis- crimination. Why did you resist taking in this information? • Recall when others resisted your attempts to help them recog- nize something as an untrue or unfair stereotype, prejudice, or form of discrimination. Why do you think there was resistance to the information you were trying to communicate? Goal 4 Cultivate each child’s ability to stand up, individually and with others, against bias or injustice. This means helping every child learn and practice a variety of ways to act in the face of bias expressed by other children and adults. Discussion Questions • What messages do you remember receiving as a child about standing up against things that are unfair? What messages do you hear in your environment now? 4 Start Seeing Diversity